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Pliers - Different Designs & How To Use Them

Use these versatile plier sets to cut wire, soft metal, etc.

Slip-Joint Pliers
These versatile slip joint pliers have both serrated teeth and coarse contoured teeth to grip objects of different shapes. The jaws can be adjusted ("slipped") to handle objects of various sizes. These pliers are most commonly available in 6- and 8-inch sizes. Use the narrow jaw setting to grip small objects. For larger objects, increase the width of the jaw opening by spreading the handles and then sliding the slotted handle along the pivot post. Close the handles to lock the setting.

Long Nose Pliers
These pliers are often used in electrical work to hold and bend wires and small parts, and to reach into tight spots. They come in two common styles straight and angle jaw. Toolprice offers great set long nose pliers, for example. The tapered flat jaws sometimes have serrated teeth. Don't push these pliers past their capacity; you might misalign the jaws. Common sizes are 5, 6, and 8 inches.

Needle Nose Pliers
These pliers are a small version of long-nose pliers and often have smooth, thin, tapered jaws that won't mar or scratch. Needle nose pliers are ideal for working with soft metals, especially in jewelry. Some models have serrated teeth, and some have spring-loaded handles. Most can cut wire. Don't push these fairly delicate pliers beyond their capacity; you might misalign the jaws.

Groove Point Pliers
The serrated teeth of these groove point pliers easily grip flat, square, round, or hexagonal objects. The jaws can be set in five positions by slipping the curved projection on one handle into the desired groove on the other handle. Use the narrowest jaw setting to grip small objects. For medium and large objects, increase the width of the jaw opening by inserting the ridge on one handle into the appropriate channel on the other handle.

Angle Nose Pliers
The offset head of these pliers is handy for working in hard-to-reach areas where extra leverage is needed. The jaws can be adjusted ("slipped") to three settings. To change the width of the jaw opening, open the handles and slide the slotted handle along the pivot post to the correct position. Close the handles to lock the setting.
Use our pliers to turn a nut only in an emergency. Pliers can round over the nut's corners, making it difficult to remove. Don't use light pliers for heavy-duty work; you might damage them.

Locking Pliers
These tools stay securely locked until you release it, making it ideal for use as a clamp or temporary vise when you need to keep both hands free. Click to purchase locking pliers from Toolprice
Using Locking Pliers
Place the opened jaws of the pliers around the object, turn the adjusting knob clockwise to narrow the jaw opening to the appropriate size, and then lock the jaws by squeezing the handles. To unclamp the object, depress the release lever or pull the handles apart.

Crimping Tool
This crimp tool measures, strips, and cuts wire, and crimps wire connectors. On most models, you use the rear section of the jaws, behind the pivot, to snip through a length of insulated wire. To strip insulation, open the jaws and place the wire in the correct wire-stripping notch; then close the handles of the tool and twist it back and forth to cut through the insulation. Then pull it toward the end of the wire, stripping off the insulation.

Caution:

  • Unless it's explicitly stated, don't assume that pliers designed for electrical work are insulated, even if the handles have a vinyl or rubber coating.
  • Be sure to turn the power off when working with house wires.

Author: Carl Robinson
Toolprice
http://www.toolprice.com


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Pliers - Different Designs & How To Use Them
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