website security
Can Crusher Digital Caliper Neiko Tools Easy Out Air Tools Drill Press Power Tools Tile Saws
Home How To Articles How To Use A File or Rasp Site Index | About Us | Contact Us Login
Search Tool
CATEGORIES
File & Rasp - The Shape Defines Their Use

Cabinet Rasp
Unlike files, which are characterized by diagonal "cuts" in the surface that form ridges, rasps have individually shaped teeth that can remove material more quickly and roughly. They are used to rough out shapes in wood, soft metal or leather. Rasps are classified by their shape or profile - for example, flat or half-round. The shape often defines their use.
There are several different types of rasps, but the cabinet rasp is perhaps the most widely used.
Using a Cabinet Rasp
Use the cabinet rasp on the push stroke, matching the pressure of the stroke to the hardness of the material being worked - light for wood, heavier for metal. Lift the rasp at the end of each stroke.
Use a special brush called a file card to clean rasp teeth often. Store rasps in slotted racks or protective sleeves to avoid damaging the teeth.
Never use a rasp on a metal harder than its own.
Cabinet rasps are available in two grades of coarseness - smooth cut and second cut (medium-coarse) - and in lengths ranging from 8 to 12 inches. Shorter rasps have smaller teeth, and so leave a smoother surface than longer rasps. The half-round style is the most versatile, because it allows you to work on flat planes and shapes outside curves (flat side), as well as inside curves and concave surfaces (half-round side).


Half-Round File
Unlike rasps, which are characterized by individual teeth that can rough out shapes and remove stock quickly, files are "cut" with parallel diagonal rows to form ridges. They are better suited to jobs in which you require a smooth, accurate finish. Files are classified by their shape or profile - flat, round, half-round, square, triangular. The shape often defines their use.

The half-round file is one of the most versatile because it has one round and one flat surface. It's therefore useful for filing both concave and flat wood or metal surfaces. The rows may be arranged in crisscrossing diagonal lines (double cut) to remove material quickly, or as parallel diagonal lines (single cut) for smoother filing.
Using A Half Round File
To shape or remove material, hold the file at both ends and at a slight angle to the work. Push it lengthwise, advancing the file forward and laterally, with even pressure - avoid rocking the file. Lift the file on the return stroke to avoid dulling its ridges.
To reduce clogging, rub the ridges with chalk. Periodically use a stiff wire brush or a special tool called a file card to remove accumulated debris. Don't tap a file against a hard or metal surface to clean it; you might damage the tool. Store your files in slotted racks or protective sleeves to prevent them scraping against each other and becoming damaged.
Never use a file on a metal that is harder than its own.

Hand File
Unlike rasps, which are characterized by individual teeth that can rough out shapes and remove stock quickly, files are "cut" with parallel diagonal rows to form ridges. They are better suited to jobs in which you require a more smooth, accurate finish. Files are classified by their shape or profile - flat, round, half-round, square, triangular. The shape often defines their use.

The hand file has a second set of parallel diagonal rows that cross the first, which means it is "double cut". These overlapping ridges form a rougher surface than single-cut files. The tool is therefore useful for jobs in which a smooth finish is not essential, but you do not want the rough treatment of a rasp. Because it is flat, this file is most suitable for trimming flat planes and shapes outside curves.
Using A Hand File
Another feature of the hand file is that one edge is uncut, or "safe". This means you can file into corners without accidentally damaging them.
To reduce clogging, rub files with chalk. Use a soft wire brush or a special tool called a file card to periodically remove accumulated debris from its ridges. Don't tap a file against a hard or metal surface to clean it; you might damage the tool. Store your files in slotted racks or protective sleeves to prevent them scraping against each other and becoming damaged.

Four-In-Hand Rasp
Unlike files, which are characterized by diagonal "cuts" in the surface that form ridges, rasps have individually shaped teeth that can remove material more quickly and roughly. Rasps and files are classified by their shape or profile - for example, flat or half-round. The shape often defines their use.
Despite its name, the four-in-hand rasp is actually a file (with ridges) on one end and a rasp (with teeth) on the other. In addition, one side of the tool is flat and the other is half-round. This means that there are essentially four ways to use the tool - flat rasping, flat filing, round rasping and round filing.

Author: Carl Robinson
Toolprice
http://www.toolprice.com


We Respect your Privacy

There are no items in the shopping cart

Help Online
Learning Center
Prefer to use the phone? - Order Toll Free (in U.S.)
(800) 475-7126 Toll Free
(909) 494-4021 Fax
File & Rasp - The Shape Defines Their Use
Copyright 2002-2014 | All Rights Reserved